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keep-away football in the surf at Lydgate Park Beach; and camping out one night a mere 60 feet from the ocean at Haena Beach, where the group set up their tents “positioned perfectly for a beautiful sunset and a beautiful sunrise,” said Hazard. And though it might seem that all Troop


315 did in Hawaii was race around from one sweaty or waterlogged activity to the next, not so. They spent plenty of time working together as a team and forming bonds that carried over into the ongoing life of the troop. “In that completely different environment,


there were no stebacks at all,” Scoutmaster Hazard said recently. “And there were no com- plaints. The boys built up closer relationships that you can see now in how well they work together in troop meetings. I wish the whole troop could have gone.”


Baltimore, the Aloha Council announced a new rental plan for the camp. It resulted in a total cost of $273 for the troop to stay seven nights. The Maryland Scouts also made a $150 donation directly to Hawaii’s Troop 133 because its camp coordinator had helped so much during the planning stages. To determine which of the adults could go,


organizers made some rules. Adults had to: fregister with the BSA. fcomply with timely payment of funds. fcomplete the necessary training courses. fhang with the boys. “Initially, we had some parents saying, ‘I’ll


Top: The Kilauea Volcano does its thing, producing a nighttime light show for the gathering at Kalapana. Right: Despite the sign, this wasn’t the end of the road for Scoutmaster Charles Hazard, Scouts Hunter Reed and Tyler Cole, and assistant Scoutmaster Ross Cole. Above: Each wave that pounds the rocky ledges at Spouting Horn sends water gushing from the blowhole, producing some colorful special effects.


go to dinner while the boys go…’” Joanna Cole said. “And I was saying, ‘No, no. If you’re going on this trip you have to be committed to doing what the boys are doing.’ We were also concerned that if we had too many parents on the trip, they might dictate the activities.” So the committee limited the number of


adults, made it clear that its decision was final, and gave the boys a lot of say in the activities. “We let the boys choose what they wanted to do, for the most part,” she said, “let them take as much control as possible. We just helped them organize it.” A fact that might help explain why the five-


day itinerary for Kauai included those tough but cool hikes. Also, why they planned down- time—if you consider “downtime” snorkeling at Queen’s Bath, a natural saltwater tide pool, and around a barrier reef at Kee Beach; playing


48 S COUTING ¿ SEPTEMBER•OCTOBER 2010


For its last two days in the islands, Troop 315 relocated to the Big Island of Hawaii. Though rain thwarted their plans to camp out in Volcanoes National Park, the adult leaders arranged two nights in the park’s cozy A-frame quarters.


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