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not everyone who dropped out did so because they couldn’t, or wouldn’t spend the $1,800 per person,” Joanna Cole stressed, though finances did play a role in the troop’s eventual decision to spend most of its time on Kauai. “Kauai gave us the most for our money.”


Below, right: Scout Neel Patel watches his step on the Na Pali Coast’s Kalalau Trail. Above: Oceanside camping at Kauai’s Haena Beach Park offers some quiet moments to play in the water (close to shore because of strong currents), hike to the area’s wet tunnels, prepare and eat some hearty, camp-cooked fare, and drift off to sleep while a local camper strums his ukelele.


didn’t prevent cost from becoming an issue from the get-go. “We had made high-adventure trips before, and they had cost a lot of money,” Joanna Cole said. “But as soon as we men- tioned Hawaii, everybody said ‘Oh, no! It’s going to cost too much.’” She started working up a cost analysis,


building in flexibility for fluctuations in airfare based on the changing prices of fuel as their travel date approached. The Scouts did their part, too, earning hundreds of dollars selling programs and cleaning up trash at equestrian events at Shawan Downs, an arrangement bro- kered by the unit’s chartered organization: the Kiwanis Club of Reisterstown. They also washed cars and, for the princely


sum of $8 an hour, cleared paths at a park in nearby Owings Mills, Md., as well as got a leg up from a local merchant. “An Outback Steakhouse cooked dinner at the firehouse where the troop meets and allowed the boys to sell tickets,” Sammarco said. “For a nominal cost, the restaurant, in turn, gave most of the proceeds back to us.” “Initially, we thought it was going to be


$1,600 per person, but then it looked like $1,800,” Joanna Cole said. “Our troop does pretty well raising funds, so we knew that if some people couldn’t come up with the extra $200 before we went, we could make it up with the fundraisers we would have when we got back. We weren’t going to leave anybody out because they couldn’t get that extra $200.” The troop treasurer tracked the progress


of payments and sent monthly reminders to both the parents and boys, so they would feel a larger sense of responsibility. “It’s easy to pro- crastinate,” she said, “and all of a sudden have $1,500 due for the trip.” Originally, about 20 kids signed up and


about 10 parents indicated they wanted to go. Of course, not everyone made the trip. “But


46 S COUTING ¿ SEPTEMBER•OCTOBER 2010


After a short flight from Oahu to Lihue, the leaders picked up their rented 12-passenger van and full-size sedan, loaded up everyone and their baggage, and bought supplies from a local discount food outlet before heading to the Aloha Council’s Camp Alan Faye. Located in a tropical-forest clearing in


Kokee State Park, a couple of miles from the Waimea Canyon overlook, Alan Faye served as the troop’s base camp for the majority of their activities. For a donation to the Aloha Council, troops coming to Hawaii can reserve facilities that include a boxcar-like barracks for the boys and for the adults, a two-story wooden lodge with three bedrooms, one bath, living area, and full kitchen. It’s a secluded spot that, as Ross Cole put it, “Lets Scouts be Scouts.” Shortly before the troop’s departure from


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